Runner’s Roost jogging around corner

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Runner’s Roost owners Linda and Gary Staines are moving their foot-wear, apparel and accessories store from 107 E. Bijou St. to 121 N. Tejon St. The store has been on Bijou Street for 31 years.
Runner’s Roost owners Linda and Gary Staines are moving their foot-wear, apparel and accessories store from 107 E. Bijou St. to 121 N. Tejon St. The store has been on Bijou Street for 31 years.

A shimmering crimson sign already stands proudly atop the façade of Runner’s Roost’s future location.

Owners Linda and Gary Staines are leaving their current location on Bijou Street for larger digs around the corner at 121 N. Tejon St. The move is planned to be completed during early May, following renovation to bring the new space up to code.

Runners Roost has occupied 1,950 square feet at 107 E. Bijou St. for 31 years. The Staines purchased the business during 2004 and liked the location.

“We’ve just outgrown our space,” Linda said. “We’re a downtown business, so we wanted to stay downtown.”

The new store has double the retail space, which will allow the Staines to offer more of the products they’re known for, as well as expanded product lines.

Linda Staines said Runner’s Roost remains vibrant, despite the challenges all retailers face during a recession.

“We’re holding our own,” she said. “I think our operations will be way smoother in a bigger location and it will make things easier for customers and our staff. We hope in the long term that it will benefit everybody.”

Affordable shoes

About 60 percent of shoes imported into the United States are hit with a tariff, and the National Retail Federation is lobbying legislators to end the 70-year-old tax.

In a bill labeled “The Affordable Footwear Act,” the NRF has asked Congress to pass legislation that would eliminate tariffs on a wide range of low-cost imported shoes, saying the new law would save shoppers upward of $800 million a year.

NRF President and CEO Tracy Mullen said the shoe tax was adopted to protect a domestic shoe industry that no longer exists. The tariff rates are highest for the lowest cost shoes, so in essence, low-income families are paying more for a basic necessity.

The proposed legislation would eliminate tariffs on about 1.5 billion pairs of shoes annually and would apply to low-cost footwear ranging from high heels to sneakers.

New iTunes prices

iTunes, Apple Inc.’s Internet music retailer, has launched its new pricing structure.

Formerly, the online store priced most songs at 99 cents. Now, songs range from 69 cents to $1.29, for the most popular hits.

Record companies will choose the prices in exchange for dropping digital rights management technology, which hinders user’s ability to copy tracks or play the songs on multiple computers.

Sports retailer expands

The Sports Authority held grand openings for nine locations, from Arizona to New Jersey, on April 4.

The Englewood-based sporting goods retailer operates two stores in Colorado Springs and one in Pueblo.

Special Olympics fundraiser

Local law enforcement officers will don aprons and serve customers at Red Robin restaurants in Colorado Springs on April 18.

As part of the fifth annual Tip-A-Cop fundraiser, officers perform wait service in exchange for customer tips. Money collected will benefit Special Olympics Colorado. The organizations have set a goal to raise $80,000 statewide.

Tip-A-Cop is part of the annual Law Enforcement Torch Run campaign, which includes an international series of relay runs and special events to help raise money for and awareness about Special Olympics.

Scott Prater covers retail for the Colorado Springs Business Journal.