Colo. trooper arrested on drunken driving charge

Filed under: Daily News |

A Colorado state trooper was arrested today on suspicion of driving drunk in uniform while he was behind the wheel of a marked patrol car and carrying a gun, authorities said.

David Nolan, 48, was arrested by Douglas County deputies about 7 a.m. on Colorado 470, a beltway around southwest Denver, the Sheriff’s Department said.

He was being booked on charges of driving under the influence and prohibited use of weapons.

Colorado law makes it illegal for anyone to have a firearm while intoxicated, sheriff’s Sgt. Jeff Egnor said.

State Patrol spokesman Ryan Sullivan said the agency would have a statement later in the day. It was unclear whether Nolan was on duty at the time of the arrest.

The arrest was made after several people reported a State Patrol car driving erratically on northbound Interstate 25 near Castle Rock, about 25 miles south of Denver.

Sheriff’s dispatchers transferred the calls to the State Patrol, and a few minutes later the patrol asked the Sheriff’s Department to help locate the car and check on the driver.

- Associated Press

2 Responses to Colo. trooper arrested on drunken driving charge

  1. If convicted, the penalty should be worse (and the existing laws need to be strengthened anyway) for a peace officer doing this! My brother was killed by a drunk driver Nov 12, 2009…. the pain our family and his friends have experienced is indescribable.There is NO excuse for anyone to drive under the influence. Call a cab, call a friend, call No DUI Colorado Springs if you live in the metro area, sleep in your car if you have to!

    Linda
    March 22, 2010 at 1:16 pm

  2. Linda, I am sorry for your loss, but your objectivity is compromised.

    There can be no difference in punishment for this offense if he is convicted. To do so would set a precedence that would allow varying punishments for various people (skin color, ethnic background, tattoos, piercings, long hair, gay, lesbian, etc…).

    I pray that he is subjected to the same punishment, embarassment and social stigma that the “civilian” population is subjected to.

    It is all too often convenient for the lawmakers, judges, police and the people related to these same individuals to be allowed to go free or offered escorts or rides home.

    I personally know a few instances where a cop (Aurora), a sheriff (Douglas County) and a judge (Colorado Springs) were allowed to drive or be driven home.

    THE POLICE AND SHERIFF’S KNOW THAT YOU CANNOT ARREST A JUDGE BECAUSE IF ONE OF THEIR CASES END UP IN THE ARRESTED JUDGES COURTROOM, THEY WILL PROBABLY LOSE THE CASE.

    Sadly, the authority that we the voters have given to these people (WHO ARE SUPPOPSED TO REPRESENT OUR BEST INTERESTS) is abused and they are now “elite” and get special treatment amongst themselves, all of which is a lack of ethics on their part.

    The last paragraph of the article says it all.

    The sheriffs transferred the call to the state patrol. Why? So that the matter coulld be handled internally? Then, when they could not locate him, the State Patrol requested help because if he did do something wrong, it would come back to haunt them.

    This definitely had the potential for “Special Treatment”! I wonder what the consequences of his mistake will be? Will it be swept under the rug?

    Victor
    March 29, 2010 at 8:50 am