Home » Entries posted by John Hazlehurst (Page 68)
Entries posted by john.hazlehurst

A question: have you watched any of the presidential debates? And if so, have you watched more than one? And if so, are you not either related to or working for one of the candidates?
The debates seem designed to bring out the least attractive features of all the candidates — and, alas, the candidates have no shortage of unattractive features. Continue Reading The two best presidential candidates aren’t running

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In mid-November, Colorado Springs Utilities released the final draft of the 2008-2012 water conservation plan.
It’s a worthy, well-conceived, eminently practical document, which lists 23 steps that utilities intends to take to reduce water use.
Colorado Springs, as the plan points out, at 112 gallons per day, already has one of the lowest per capita rates of residential water use in Colorado and the Southwest. Continue Reading Time to admit that solving water woes won’t be painless

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The wildfires that ravaged southern California might seem a world away, but conditions exist along the Front Range which could produce similar devastation in the Pike Peak region.
And the cost of damages such fires might cause could reach into the billions. Continue Reading Urban interface wildfire: disaster waiting to happen

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Forests in the Pikes Peak region have been blackened by immense wildfires many times during the past.
During the fall of 1853, a fire started east of Cheyenne Mountain and, driven by southeast winds, burned unchecked for three weeks until it reached the top of Wilkerson Pass, 70 miles from its origin. Continue Reading Pikes Peak region has had its share of wildfires, blazes

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“Might as well face it — I’m addicted to … print!”
It’s a generational thing, I suspect. Those of us who came of age before 1980 are used to finding what we want in print. Whether we want to be informed, comforted, amused, fascinated, challenged or titillated — it’s all there. Continue Reading Digital archives offer sterile view of the printed past

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Two-way Tejon windfall: A big empty promise?

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Far from pumping an additional $100,000 a day into the local economy, the city’s decision to convert Tejon Street to two-way traffic could actually cause a decrease in revenue for downtown merchants.
“Planners argue that converting one-way to two-way streets will make them more pedestrian friendly and better for business,” according to “No Two Ways About It: One-Way Streets are Better than Two-Ways,” a report written by Michael Cunneen and Randal O’Toole for the Independence Institute during 2005. “They offer no evidence for these claims, which had been disproved by engineers 50 years ago. But few people remembered the benefits gained from converting two-way to one-way streets, so many believed the planners.” Continue Reading Two-way Tejon windfall: A big empty promise?

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Get ready for one of the more delicious moments in American politics: the creation of an elegant, double-barreled neologism, in this case a new verb which describes actions with which we are all familiar, and for which we have no colorfully descriptive term.
Here’s the new verb: blue-ribbon. (Trust me, it really isn’t just an adjective any more — just notice the hyphen.)
It was first mentioned — to me, at least — by Denver lobbyist Eric Anderson, who attributes its first use to Gov. Bill Ritter’s chief of staff, Evan Dreyer. Continue Reading We’ve got a new verb, and a fine group of dames to be thankful for

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Fewer fliers, but is there a silver lining?

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Passenger numbers are increasing at airports nationwide and in Denver, but the same can’t be said for Colorado Springs.
Enplanement trends at Colorado Springs Airport for 2007 are “disappointing,” according to the latest quarterly economic update of business conditions from Fred Crowley, an economics professor at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. Continue Reading Fewer fliers, but is there a silver lining?

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Most businesses are judged by objective outcomes.
Does the service or product have a market? If so, are those services/products efficiently delivered, allowing the business to make a profit and continue as a going concern?
Is the business healthy? Is it adequately capitalized, appropriately located and serving a stable or growing market? Does it have strategic plans in place that will enable it to survive changes in its market? Continue Reading Business of education: A tale of two elementary schools

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The economy may be drifting into recession, but at least one profession is experiencing an unparalleled boom: political consulting!
If you have even the slightest expertise in politics, or economics, or polling, or direct mail or Internet marketing, this is your time in the sun.
No more Ramen noodles and Pabst Blue Ribbon for you. Nope, from now on it’s Sonoma Cutrer and Maine lobster! Continue Reading It’s a halcyon time for the political consulting industry

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