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Entries posted by john.hazlehurst

Las Vegas not ruling out any of its water options

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Like a gambler playing multiple slots simultaneously, Las Vegas continues to explore water options, some of them as bizarre and unlikely as the city itself.
There has been speculation that Las Vegas could negotiate a deal with Mexico to obtain rights to a portion of Mexico’s Colorado River entitlement. The city would build a massive desalination plant on the Gulf of California, at a cost of more than a billion dollars, which would replace the muddy, contaminated soup that currently flows into Mexico. Continue Reading Las Vegas not ruling out any of its water options

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In an extensive and detailed report, the Southern Nevada Water Authority discussed how it intends to supply water to the city during the next several decades. The plan calls for recycling 100 percent of the city’s wastewater, continuing the city’s draconian water conservation measures, banking surplus Colorado River water, and developing new groundwater and surface water sources. Continue Reading Nevada’s prosperity inextricably linked to Sin City

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The baddest of the bad?

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We can all name our favorites structures — buildings which, like the Cadet Chapel at the Air Force Academy, or the Fine Arts Center or the stately homes along Wood Avenue, lift our spirits and gladden our hearts.
But what about their opposite numbers?
What about buildings that are as cold and forbidding as a Chicago winter, as grating as a bad karaoke singer or as irritating as a boom car blaring hip-hop at 7 a.m.? Continue Reading The baddest of the bad?

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Evolving bacteria:

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When penicillin became widely available during the Second World War, it was a medical miracle, quickly overcoming the biggest wartime killer — infected wounds. But within four years after drug companies began mass-producing penicillin in 1943, resistant microbes began to appear.
Since 1947, scores of antibiotics have been introduced by drug companies and every one has been compromised by resistant bacteria. Continue Reading Evolving bacteria:

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Colorado Springs is renowned for its climate, with more than 300 days of sunshine annually. Yet, despite an ideal climate for both solar heating and solar electric generation, few city residents have installed such systems in their houses, or in their businesses.
But that may be changing. Spurred by rebates and tax credits, the rising cost of utility services and concern about global warming, solar seems poised for a breakthrough. Continue Reading Lower prices, technology create new dawn for solar energy

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Springs Utilities embracing green approach

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A dozen years ago, it might have been possible to characterize Colorado Springs Utilities as remiss in environmental stewardship.
Guided by longstanding city policies that gave precedence to low rates and efficient operations above everything else, CSU was slow to acknowledge the importance and the benefits of aggressive “green” programs. Continue Reading Springs Utilities embracing green approach

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Vegas betting on far-away water deals

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For the past six decades, Las Vegas has been the fastest growing city in America.
In 1950, 24,624 people lived in Vegas; today, 591,536 residents call it home.
And that’s just the incorporated city. The Las Vegas Metropolitan Area, with a population of less than 30,000 in 1950, has grown to 1.78 million. Continue Reading Vegas betting on far-away water deals

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Compact based on leaky logic

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In 1922, Colorado and six other western states, signed the Colorado River Compact, which along with a 1944 treaty with Mexico, the 1948 Upper Colorado River Compact and several federal laws and Supreme Court decisions comprise the “Law of the River.”
The Law of the River governs all uses of the water in the Colorado River. It determines who may divert its waters, where its waters are stored, where they are used and how disputes must be settled. Continue Reading Compact based on leaky logic

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Warmer temperatures, less rainfall equal less water

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Stream gauges have only been in use for a century. To understand earlier conditions on the Colorado River, scientists study ancient tree rings.
Paleoclimatologists at the University of Arizona discovered an epic megadrought that lasted for more than six decades during the mid-1100s. The drought was remarkable because of the absence of very wet years, and might well have created the conditions that led the Anasazi to abandon Mesa Verde. Continue Reading Warmer temperatures, less rainfall equal less water

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It’s hard not to feel sorry for our hapless congressman, Doug Lamborn.
Abandoning his usual agenda (God, guns and Bush: good — abortion, gays and taxes: bad), Lamborn seized on what he must have thought would have been a feel-good item: make Pikes Peak a National Monument! Continue Reading Ol’ Doug might just be right about national monument

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