Home » Entries posted by John Hazlehurst (Page 70)
Entries posted by john.hazlehurst

Forests in the Pikes Peak region have been blackened by immense wildfires many times during the past.
During the fall of 1853, a fire started east of Cheyenne Mountain and, driven by southeast winds, burned unchecked for three weeks until it reached the top of Wilkerson Pass, 70 miles from its origin. Continue Reading Pikes Peak region has had its share of wildfires, blazes

Continue reading …

“Might as well face it — I’m addicted to … print!”
It’s a generational thing, I suspect. Those of us who came of age before 1980 are used to finding what we want in print. Whether we want to be informed, comforted, amused, fascinated, challenged or titillated — it’s all there. Continue Reading Digital archives offer sterile view of the printed past

Continue reading …

Two-way Tejon windfall: A big empty promise?

Comments Off

Far from pumping an additional $100,000 a day into the local economy, the city’s decision to convert Tejon Street to two-way traffic could actually cause a decrease in revenue for downtown merchants.
“Planners argue that converting one-way to two-way streets will make them more pedestrian friendly and better for business,” according to “No Two Ways About It: One-Way Streets are Better than Two-Ways,” a report written by Michael Cunneen and Randal O’Toole for the Independence Institute during 2005. “They offer no evidence for these claims, which had been disproved by engineers 50 years ago. But few people remembered the benefits gained from converting two-way to one-way streets, so many believed the planners.” Continue Reading Two-way Tejon windfall: A big empty promise?

Continue reading …

Get ready for one of the more delicious moments in American politics: the creation of an elegant, double-barreled neologism, in this case a new verb which describes actions with which we are all familiar, and for which we have no colorfully descriptive term.
Here’s the new verb: blue-ribbon. (Trust me, it really isn’t just an adjective any more — just notice the hyphen.)
It was first mentioned — to me, at least — by Denver lobbyist Eric Anderson, who attributes its first use to Gov. Bill Ritter’s chief of staff, Evan Dreyer. Continue Reading We’ve got a new verb, and a fine group of dames to be thankful for

Continue reading …

Fewer fliers, but is there a silver lining?

Comments Off

Passenger numbers are increasing at airports nationwide and in Denver, but the same can’t be said for Colorado Springs.
Enplanement trends at Colorado Springs Airport for 2007 are “disappointing,” according to the latest quarterly economic update of business conditions from Fred Crowley, an economics professor at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. Continue Reading Fewer fliers, but is there a silver lining?

Continue reading …

Most businesses are judged by objective outcomes.
Does the service or product have a market? If so, are those services/products efficiently delivered, allowing the business to make a profit and continue as a going concern?
Is the business healthy? Is it adequately capitalized, appropriately located and serving a stable or growing market? Does it have strategic plans in place that will enable it to survive changes in its market? Continue Reading Business of education: A tale of two elementary schools

Continue reading …

The economy may be drifting into recession, but at least one profession is experiencing an unparalleled boom: political consulting!
If you have even the slightest expertise in politics, or economics, or polling, or direct mail or Internet marketing, this is your time in the sun.
No more Ramen noodles and Pabst Blue Ribbon for you. Nope, from now on it’s Sonoma Cutrer and Maine lobster! Continue Reading It’s a halcyon time for the political consulting industry

Continue reading …

Gold Camp Elementary is the newest elementary school in District 12. Thanks to a voter-approved bond issue, which authorized the school’s construction, Gold Camp opened its doors during 1997.
The school campus includes 10.4 landscaped acres on the edge of the Stratton Preserve, an upscale community north of Cheyenne Canyon. The school has 43, 830 square feet in a modern building, which includes amenities and features undreamed of when Buena Vista was constructed 88 years earlier. Continue Reading Gold Camp facing challenge of maintaining gold standard

Continue reading …

Buena Vista Elementary opened its doors during the fall of 1911, and The Gazette described the building in glowing terms:
“The latest and most up-to-date addition to the already large school system of Colorado Springs is the Buena Vista school, built on the cottage or unit plan at an approximate cost of $36,000. The plant, consisting of six buildings, occupies the entire 1600 block on Park Avenue (now Bijou Street), West Colorado Springs. Continue Reading Buena Vista battling declining enrollment, aging facilities (15311)

Continue reading …

The El Pomar Foundation is negotiating to acquire the historic McAllister House from the National Society of Colonial Dames in Colorado.
Built during 1873 at 423 N. Cascade Ave. by Maj. Henry McAllister, the first director of Gen. William Jackson Palmer’s Colorado Springs Co., McAllister House is one of the most significant historic properties in the city. It has been operated as a house museum by the Colonial Dames since 1960 when the society acquired it. At the time, it was believed that the then-owners intended to tear it down and use the site as a parking lot. Continue Reading Dames close to sealing plan to share McAllister House

Continue reading …