Home » Entries posted by John Hazlehurst (Page 71)
Entries posted by john.hazlehurst

Ariz. would bear brunt of water restrictions

Comments Off

Of all the states that divided the waters of the Colorado River in 1922, Arizona may have cut the best deal — at least it seemed so at the time.
But 85 years later, because of the state’s explosive growth, the ongoing drought and the state’s junior rights to its allocated water, the deal might not be so good after all. Continue Reading Ariz. would bear brunt of water restrictions

Continue reading …

For a desert community, where summertime temperatures routinely exceed 115 degrees, Phoenix uses water with a profligacy that has long astonished newcomers.
Flying into the city, the grays and browns of the desert landscape are transformed into blues and greens. As if it were a finely wrought brooch of turquoise and lapis lazuli, the city seems to be defined by the deep, startling green of golf courses bordered by the shimmering blue of thousands of swimming pools. Continue Reading Pools, golf courses define the Phoenix-area lifestyle

Continue reading …

Are Phoenix water providers, policymakers and the business community prepared for a future of radically curtailed water supplies?
The Phoenix Water Department has prepared contingency plans for a “Water Crisis,” which would be declared when “… emergency supply and use reduction programs are insufficient to meet water demand.” Continue Reading Phoenix appears to have little concern about water

Continue reading …

Vegas betting on far-away water deals

Comments Off

For the past six decades, Las Vegas has been the fastest growing city in America.
In 1950, 24,624 people lived in Vegas; today, 591,536 residents call it home.
And that’s just the incorporated city. The Las Vegas Metropolitan Area, with a population of less than 30,000 in 1950, has grown to 1.78 million. Continue Reading Vegas betting on far-away water deals

Continue reading …

Las Vegas not ruling out any of its water options

Comments Off

Like a gambler playing multiple slots simultaneously, Las Vegas continues to explore water options, some of them as bizarre and unlikely as the city itself.
There has been speculation that Las Vegas could negotiate a deal with Mexico to obtain rights to a portion of Mexico’s Colorado River entitlement. The city would build a massive desalination plant on the Gulf of California, at a cost of more than a billion dollars, which would replace the muddy, contaminated soup that currently flows into Mexico. Continue Reading Las Vegas not ruling out any of its water options

Continue reading …

In an extensive and detailed report, the Southern Nevada Water Authority discussed how it intends to supply water to the city during the next several decades. The plan calls for recycling 100 percent of the city’s wastewater, continuing the city’s draconian water conservation measures, banking surplus Colorado River water, and developing new groundwater and surface water sources. Continue Reading Nevada’s prosperity inextricably linked to Sin City

Continue reading …

The baddest of the bad?

Comments Off

We can all name our favorites structures — buildings which, like the Cadet Chapel at the Air Force Academy, or the Fine Arts Center or the stately homes along Wood Avenue, lift our spirits and gladden our hearts.
But what about their opposite numbers?
What about buildings that are as cold and forbidding as a Chicago winter, as grating as a bad karaoke singer or as irritating as a boom car blaring hip-hop at 7 a.m.? Continue Reading The baddest of the bad?

Continue reading …

Evolving bacteria:

Comments Off

When penicillin became widely available during the Second World War, it was a medical miracle, quickly overcoming the biggest wartime killer — infected wounds. But within four years after drug companies began mass-producing penicillin in 1943, resistant microbes began to appear.
Since 1947, scores of antibiotics have been introduced by drug companies and every one has been compromised by resistant bacteria. Continue Reading Evolving bacteria:

Continue reading …

Colorado Springs is renowned for its climate, with more than 300 days of sunshine annually. Yet, despite an ideal climate for both solar heating and solar electric generation, few city residents have installed such systems in their houses, or in their businesses.
But that may be changing. Spurred by rebates and tax credits, the rising cost of utility services and concern about global warming, solar seems poised for a breakthrough. Continue Reading Lower prices, technology create new dawn for solar energy

Continue reading …

Springs Utilities embracing green approach

Comments Off

A dozen years ago, it might have been possible to characterize Colorado Springs Utilities as remiss in environmental stewardship.
Guided by longstanding city policies that gave precedence to low rates and efficient operations above everything else, CSU was slow to acknowledge the importance and the benefits of aggressive “green” programs. Continue Reading Springs Utilities embracing green approach

Continue reading …