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Entries posted by john.hazlehurst

Want some interesting reading? Take a look at the El Pomar Foundation’s most recent annual report, which details every grant that the foundation made during 2006.
El Pomar has been such a ubiquitous and important player for so many years that it’s difficult to imagine life without it. Deeply rooted in the community, El Pomar is unlike any other entity in Colorado Springs. Continue Reading In case you haven’t done it lately, thank God for El Pomar

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Riding up the Santa Fe Trail to the north boundary of the Air Force Academy on a recent sunny weekday afternoon, I expected to have the trail to myself. It was late October in the middle of the workday, so most of my fellow cyclists would be stuck in their cubicles.
In fact, there were plenty of riders on the trail. They were fit, lycra-clad, fast-moving … geezers! Continue Reading So much for the myth about retirement — go geezers!

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OK, what kind of city are we? Our goal, according to several iterations of our city&rsquo;s nonsensical and ever-changing mission statement, is to be a &ldquo;world-class city.&rdquo;<br>
But, as University of Colorado at Colorado Springs economics professor Tom Zwirlein pointed out the other day, that might not be a realistic goal.<br> Continue Reading Time to accept that we&rsquo;re a &lsquo;third city&rsquo; and proud of it

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City mulling options for Fire Station 1

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Another city landmark might soon be just a memory.
Next year’s city budget includes a proposal to sell Fire Station 1 and build a new station elsewhere, or construct a new station “on or near the existing site.” The city estimates that the sale of the existing building might bring as much as $1.2 million. Continue Reading City mulling options for Fire Station 1

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On Aug. 13, northern Colorado rancher W.D. Farr died at the age of 97. His passing marked the end of an era.
Bill Farr was the last of his generation of visionary “water buffalos” — men who saw that the Front Range could not flourish and grow without undertaking enormous transmountain water diversions from the Colorado River. A near-contemporary of California’s William Mulholland, Farr brought the same drive and determination to obtaining water for the parched cities and farms of northern Colorado. Continue Reading Springs seeking solutions beyond Colorado River for water supplies

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Here’s an excerpt from a recent article in the New York Times.
“As struggling newspapers across the country cut back on investigative reporting, a new kind of journalism venture is hoping to fill the gap.
“Paul E. Steiger, who was the top editor of The Wall Street Journal for 16 years, and a pair of wealthy Californians are assembling a group of investigative journalists who will give away their work to media outlets. Continue Reading Interesting investigation into a new old-media proposal

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Water supply not likely to increase

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“the Southwest appears to be entering a new drought era … even several of the wetter runs yield increasing drought due to the overwhelming effect of the heat-related moisture loss.”
Nolan Doesken, CSU Climatologist and Klaus Wolter, NOAA Continue Reading Water supply not likely to increase

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The 1922 compact, which divided the flow of the Colorado River among seven western states, allocated 7.5 million acre-feet to the Upper Basin states of Colorado, Utah, Wyoming and New Mexico.
Colorado’s share amounts to 51.75 percent of 7.5 million acre-feet, or slightly more than 3.88 million acre-feet annually. Colorado diverts less than the state’s allotment, so, it would seem that we could tap the river for more. Continue Reading Lingering question: Is there still water to develop?

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Bringing up the rear

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As the Economic Development Corp.’s Mike Kazmierski is fond of pointing out, Colorado Springs has many competitors — not only cities in the Midwest and the Rocky Mountain region, but cities across the nation and in dozens of foreign countries.
In a global economy, companies and the entrepreneurs who create them have virtually limitless choices for locales, chock full of welcoming local governments, available capital and skilled work forces. Continue Reading Bringing up the rear

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Calif. may have squandered its water future

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Los Angeles receives water through the Metropolitan Water District, which operates the 242-mile-long Colorado River Aqueduct and delivers water to 20 different municipalities in Southern California.
In 2001, California, which had long used more than its 4.4 million acre-feet allotment granted by the Colorado River Compact of 1922, agreed to end its overuse. As part of the deal, the MWD accepted lower priority rights to Colorado River water than those of agricultural users. Continue Reading Calif. may have squandered its water future

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