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Entries posted by john.hazlehurst

Blowing smoke at the ban

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In 2005, the Colorado Senate killed a proposed smoking ban by two votes on the last day of the legislative session. Supporters vowed that they’d reintroduce the legislation — and at the beginning of the 2006 session, HB1175, The Colorado Clean Indoor Air Act, was introduced.
Sponsored by two powerful legislators — Republican Mike May in the House and Democrat Dan Grossman in the Senate — the bill enjoyed substantial bipartisan support, reflecting statewide polls. Continue Reading Blowing smoke at the ban

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The demise of dinosaurs, horses and men

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The other day, I was hanging out with my friend the Beautiful Business Owner. She’s a single woman in her early 30s — smart, poised, beautiful, successful, single … and pregnant. And no, she doesn’t have a boyfriend — and no, she’s not gay.
Like so many woman in similar circumstances, she decided that she wants a child, that she’s perfectly capable of raising it alone and that she doesn’t need a husband/boyfriend/significant other to be involved in the process. Continue Reading The demise of dinosaurs, horses and men

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Museum growth, rehab fueling building boom

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While the last decade of the 20th century likely will be remembered for the Internet boom, the first decade of the 21st just might be remembered for … the art museum boom.
Across the country, scores of museums are being built, renovated or expanded.
In New York, the Museum of Modern Art was completely recreated, at a cost of more than $450 million. In Los Angeles, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art has embarked on an ambitious, Renzo Piano-designed expansion that will cost hundreds of millions of dollars. Continue Reading Museum growth, rehab fueling building boom

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One hundred and fifteen years ago, the discovery of gold in Cripple Creek fueled the growth of Colorado Springs from a sleepy resort to an over-the-top boomtown.
Spencer Penrose and Winfield Scott Stratton accumulated great fortunes within a few years, and scores of tough-minded, adventurous young men became overnight millionaires. Continue Reading 21st century gold mining: Bet on things being big

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Just a few years after the city’s founding, Tejon Street had become the place to be for retailers, banks, grocery stores and merchants of all description.
In the 1898 “Colorado Springs Blue Book,” the social register of the day, there were numerous ads for Tejon Street businesses.
Charles Emery, photographer, was at 15 South Tejon. “It’s fun to have your picture taken at Emery’s.” Continue Reading Downtown business pulse still beats on Tejon Street

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The death of dailies – inevitable or not?

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A few weeks ago, David Carr, a reporter for the New York Times had “the conversation” with a fellow reporter.
As Carr reported it: “We’re both 49 — are we going to make it?” Would they finish their careers at the Times, or would their jobs simply disappear? Would even the proud Times fall victim to the transformative power of the Internet?
Consider how a newspaper is created.
Every story, every ad, every illustration exists only in electronic form. Graphic designers electronically compose the newspaper which, when completed, is electronically transmitted to the printer—or, rather, to the computer that controls and schedules the press run. Continue Reading The death of dailies – inevitable or not?

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The local economy’s great — or is it?

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Spent some time last week with Greater Colorado Springs Economic Development CEO Mike Kazmierski, who had some interesting — and brutally frank — things to say about the state of our economy.
Looks pretty good, doesn’t it, Mike? Housing starts are holding well, we’re anticipating a flood of new arrivals at Fort Carson, the Pro Rodeo Cowboys Association might stay, the power developers are about to break ground on a five-star downtown hotel … what’s not to like? Continue Reading The local economy’s great — or is it?

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Ballot overload and the not-so-sexy six

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Walking out of my neighborhood supermarket the other day, I was accosted by a middle-aged woman with a petition for me to sign.
She was a paid petition circulator, making a couple of bucks a signature. And what, exactly, would I be signing? Continue Reading Ballot overload and the not-so-sexy six

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SDS: The not-so-perfect water solution?

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The 1980s and 1990s were not good years for “water buffalos” — the nickname given to the powerful, tough-minded men who conceive and direct major water projects.
The Denver Water Board saw its plans for a massive dam on the Platte River near Deckers killed by the Environmental Protection Agency, while Colorado Springs was forced to abandon the Homestake II project in the Holy Cross Wilderness. Continue Reading SDS: The not-so-perfect water solution?

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Water: An issue since Day 1

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One five-letter word defines the economic history of Colorado Springs: water. Without our far-flung system of collecting, storing, transporting and treating water, the city would not exist.
Unlike Pueblo or Denver, both of which were located on the main stem of significant rivers (the Platte and the Arkansas), the city’s founders chose, as Manly Ormes wrote in 1916, “… an arid plateau where not even the native trees could get started … it was nothing but a desert with a wonderful setting.” Continue Reading Water: An issue since Day 1

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