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In mid-November, Colorado Springs Utilities released the final draft of the 2008-2012 water conservation plan.
It’s a worthy, well-conceived, eminently practical document, which lists 23 steps that utilities intends to take to reduce water use.
Colorado Springs, as the plan points out, at 112 gallons per day, already has one of the lowest per capita rates of residential water use in Colorado and the Southwest. Continue Reading Time to admit that solving water woes won’t be painless

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“Might as well face it — I’m addicted to … print!”
It’s a generational thing, I suspect. Those of us who came of age before 1980 are used to finding what we want in print. Whether we want to be informed, comforted, amused, fascinated, challenged or titillated — it’s all there. Continue Reading Digital archives offer sterile view of the printed past

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Get ready for one of the more delicious moments in American politics: the creation of an elegant, double-barreled neologism, in this case a new verb which describes actions with which we are all familiar, and for which we have no colorfully descriptive term.
Here’s the new verb: blue-ribbon. (Trust me, it really isn’t just an adjective any more — just notice the hyphen.)
It was first mentioned — to me, at least — by Denver lobbyist Eric Anderson, who attributes its first use to Gov. Bill Ritter’s chief of staff, Evan Dreyer. Continue Reading We’ve got a new verb, and a fine group of dames to be thankful for

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The economy may be drifting into recession, but at least one profession is experiencing an unparalleled boom: political consulting!
If you have even the slightest expertise in politics, or economics, or polling, or direct mail or Internet marketing, this is your time in the sun.
No more Ramen noodles and Pabst Blue Ribbon for you. Nope, from now on it’s Sonoma Cutrer and Maine lobster! Continue Reading It’s a halcyon time for the political consulting industry

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Want some interesting reading? Take a look at the El Pomar Foundation’s most recent annual report, which details every grant that the foundation made during 2006.
El Pomar has been such a ubiquitous and important player for so many years that it’s difficult to imagine life without it. Deeply rooted in the community, El Pomar is unlike any other entity in Colorado Springs. Continue Reading In case you haven’t done it lately, thank God for El Pomar

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Riding up the Santa Fe Trail to the north boundary of the Air Force Academy on a recent sunny weekday afternoon, I expected to have the trail to myself. It was late October in the middle of the workday, so most of my fellow cyclists would be stuck in their cubicles.
In fact, there were plenty of riders on the trail. They were fit, lycra-clad, fast-moving … geezers! Continue Reading So much for the myth about retirement — go geezers!

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OK, what kind of city are we? Our goal, according to several iterations of our city&rsquo;s nonsensical and ever-changing mission statement, is to be a &ldquo;world-class city.&rdquo;<br>
But, as University of Colorado at Colorado Springs economics professor Tom Zwirlein pointed out the other day, that might not be a realistic goal.<br> Continue Reading Time to accept that we&rsquo;re a &lsquo;third city&rsquo; and proud of it

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Here’s an excerpt from a recent article in the New York Times.
“As struggling newspapers across the country cut back on investigative reporting, a new kind of journalism venture is hoping to fill the gap.
“Paul E. Steiger, who was the top editor of The Wall Street Journal for 16 years, and a pair of wealthy Californians are assembling a group of investigative journalists who will give away their work to media outlets. Continue Reading Interesting investigation into a new old-media proposal

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I spent much of last weekend in Denver, watching the Rockies and the Broncos.
You won’t be surprised to learn that the Rockies’ win was far more enjoyable than the Broncos’ loss — but, taken together, the events had a certain similarity. Continue Reading Lessons to be learned from watching grown men play

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Some years ago, I listened to Terry Gross interview a successful Las Vegas businessman on National Public Radio.
Terry asked what it was like to be a resident of Vegas, working and living as one would in any Ame­rican city. Was it strange, difficult or disorienting?
“Well,” the businessman replied “Las Vegas is the best place in the world to start a business, not really work very hard, be successful, and live the good life” — he paused for a moment — “if you have no weaknesses. But if you do, this town will find them, and destroy you.” Continue Reading Las Vegas proves to be the shining star of capitalism

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